Green, green grains

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June 3rd, 2010 by Admin

Gorgeous progress shots from Cedar Isle, sent along by Jim the other day.

In this first one you can see three different winter varieties (left, centre and right, discernible by slight color variation.) There’s also a bit of “lodging” visible in the distance, where rain and/or wind has knocked down some of the shafts. This makes machine harvest difficult, so is not ideal, but I believe it can rectify itself with time.

three-winter-cereals-after-a-windy-rain-showing-modest-lodging-in-distance

Here, a close up of one of the above varieties; this is the winter Triticale.

winter-triticale

Below is a field of winter rye, some of which has recently been cut to save as silage for the cattle kept by Cedar Isle Farm and their neighbours.

winter-rye-length-of-field-after-grass-has-been-cut-for-silage

And here’s a closer shot of that same winter rye; you get a good view of the seed heads here, which have already formed.

winter-rye-heading-out

This is a patch of winter wheat that has been affected by rust, which you can tell by the yellowing of the leaves.

winter-wheat-with-rust-1

Close up of the rusted leaves:

winter-wheat-with-rust-2

Now, onto the spring-planted varieties which were put in much more recently. This first one is a soft white spring wheat. It will be more of a pastry/cake/cookie flour when it ends up at our members’ homes, due to the low gluten content.

soft-white-spring-wheat

Next up we have two varieties of hard red spring wheat, side by side. These guys have higher gluten content, and will therefore be better bread flours. As you can see, the spring-planted varieties are much farther behind the overwintering fields in terms of growth, but they should catch up with some summer sun.two-varieties-of-hard-red-spring-wheat

This last shot is of a trial plot where Jim is seeding some older heritage grains. These won’t end up in the CSA packages, but we’ll keep you informed if anything interesting comes of them.

seeding-plots-of-older-and-heritage-wheat-varieties